Abbott And Costello Meet Frankenstein (Universal International Pictures, 1948)

One Sheet Poster

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Berkeley Daily Gazatte, Berkeley, California, February 5, 1948

HEDDA HOPPER’S HOLLYWOOD

by Hedda Hopper

 Bela’s Last Horror

Bela Lugosi swears Brain of Frankenstein will be his last horror picture; but he will have  one more fling at Dracula on the London stage. Then, of all things, he will do four weeks of Harvey. That can only be matched by Boris Karloff, another horror man, who did kindly old Gramps in On Borrowed Time last year.

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Jasper Daily Herald, Jasper, Indiana, February 28, 1948

IN HOLLYWOOD

Hollywood, Feb. 28—(INS)—The king of screen goons, Lon Chaney, Jr., plans to invest some of his own money in his next horror pictures.

What’s more, he’s thought up two new fiendish delights to scare the wits out of his fans.

He isn’t saying yet what form the new monsters will take, but he ought to know what he’s doing. Lon is the only goon man who has played them all, Wolf Man, Frankenstein’s Monster, Dracula, the Mummy and all the rest.

I talked to Lon at Universal-International. He’s currently playing The Wolf Man in Brain of Frankenstein, which is a combination horror and comedy, what with Abbott & Costello, Bela Lugosi as Dracula and Glenn Strange as Frankenstein’s Monster.

“I’ve been doing these goon roles for 17 years,” Lon said, “The fans who like them, and there are lots of them, line up at the theatres in as big numbers as they ever did.”

“That’s why I’m anxious to get a piece of my own money into a couple of productions. It’s a good investment.”

Lon conceded that the good make-ups are tough on a man.

“I have a new Wolf Man outfit which I can get on in two hours, which is a big break,” he said, “Up to this picture it used to take me six hours. I’d have to get to the studio at 3 am.

“Monster” Strange, who had been discussing fishing with “Dracula” spoke up:

“It sure is hard work. I was so tired when I got home last night I slept 12 hours. Generally I wake up two or three times during the night and walk around the house.”

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Oakland, Tribune, Oakland, California, March 3, 1948

HOLLYWOOD BLOW HOT FOR CHILLERS

by Bob Thomas

Hollywood, Feb. 3—(AP)—Two of the screen’s ablest boogeymen, Bela Lugosi and Lon Chaney, are planning projects to satisfy the most eager horror fans.

Both are currently scaring the wits out of Abbott & Costello in Abbott & Costello Meet Frankenstein, and Lugosi reports that Universal-International is mulling two subjects based on his Dracula portrayal. “There is enough material in the original novel for half a dozen pictures,” the Hungarian actor told me. Meanwhile, he plans to take the famed blood-sucker to London for an eight-week stage run this summer.

Chaney is organizing his own producing company with Curt Siodmak, top writer of gruesome scripts. They plan to create new characters “more horrible than any yet seen on the screen.” I can hardly wait.

(NOTE: The two Dracula films and the stage production of Dracula failed to materialize. Lugosi eventually portrayed Dracula on the British stage in 1951: See 1951 British Dracula Tour – Newspaper Articles And Memorabilia)

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The New York Times, March 14, 1948

OLD GHOULISH FRIENDS ROAM THE SETS AT UNIVERSAL

Universal-International, long the home of spectral entertainment attained a chimerical crescendo in recent weeks with an incarnation of Venus, a mermaid, Frankenstein’s monster, Dracula, The Wolf Man, and The Invisible Man all working at once. The majority of these loveable characters are concentrated in Abbott & Costello Meet Frankenstein, a film described by the studio as a comedy. Glen Strange is playing both The Monster and The Invisible Man, since, in the first characterization he need only be visible and in the second, only audible. Lon Chaney, Jr. has resumed his old mantle as the studio’s lycanthrope and will climax the drama by battling to the death with the monstrous Mr. Strange.

Bela Lugosi, the perpetual Dracula, disclosed last week, that he is to be revived for his new appearance by one of the unwary comedians who is foolish enough to pull an oaken state out of his heart. Mr. Lugosi, who was scrambling on the floor of his dressing room for a missing shirt stud at the time, commented that he was relieved that Universal had not asked him to do anything unbecoming to Dracula’s dignity in the association with Abbott & Costello. “There is no burlesque for me,” he said. “All I have to do is frighten the boys, a perfectly appropriate activity. My trademark will be unblemished.” He will not be permitted to sink his teeth in anyone’s jugular vein in the comedy; and will have to content himself with hypnotizing a girl and transforming himself into a bat from time to time.

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Richmond Times Dispatch, April 25, 1948

Abbott & Costello Meet Frankenstein, Richmond Times Dispatch, April 25, 1948*

Film Bulletin, July 5, 1948

‘ABBOTT AND COSTELLO MEET FRANKENSTEIN’ GAGS AND GOOSE-PIMPLES

Abbott And Costello Meet Frankenstein Film Bulletin, July 5, 1948

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The Film Daily, July 16, 1948

The Film Daily July 16 1948

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The Film Daily, July 22, 1948

アボットとコステロミートフランケンシュタイン映画の日の1948年7月22日2*

Seattle Daily Times, July 28, 1948

Abbott & Costello Meet Frankenstein, Seattle Daily Times, July 28, 1948 2*

The New York Times, July 29, 1948

THE SCREEN

That One Laugh

BC

Most of the comic invention in “Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein” is embraced in the idea and the title. The notion of having these two clowns run afoul of the famous screen monster is a good laugh in itself. But take this gentle warning: get the most out of that one laugh while you can, because the picture, at Loew’s Criterion, does not contain many more.

That is to say, the situations which the wags at Universal have contrived for their two untiring comedians in this assembly-line comedy are the obvious complications that would occur in a house of horrors. Costello, the roly-poly and completely susceptible one, shudders and shakes in standard terror to behold the assembly of ghouls—which includes not only the monster but Count Dracula and the Wolfman. Abbott, prevented from seeing the creatures until near the end, scoffs and snorts at his partner from behaving so curiously. After a thorough exhaustion of this play on frustration and fright, the story is brought to a climax with the intended transference of a brain. Whose brain is tagged for what monster we leave you to surmise.

That One Laugh

ABBOTT AND COSTELLO MEET FRANKENSTEIN, original screen play by Robert Lees, Frederic I. Rinaldo and John Grant; directed by Charles T. Barton; produced by Robert Arthur for Universal-International Pictures. At Loew’s Criterion.
Chick . . . . . Bud Abbott
Wilbur . . . . . Lou Costello
Lawrence Talbot . . . . . Lon Chaney
Dracula . . . . . Bela Lugosi
Monster . . . . . Glenn Strange
Sandra Mornay . . . . . Lenore Aubert
Joan Raymond . . . . . Jane Randolph
Mr. McDougal . . . . . Frank Ferguson
Dr. Stevens . . . . . Charles Bradstreet

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Laredo Times, Laredo, Texas, August 8, 1948

WOLF MAN, DRACULA, MONSTER APPEAR IN PLAZA MIDNIGHT SHOW

During filming of Abbott & Costello Meet Frankenstein, Wolf Man Chaney, Dracula Lugosi and Monster Strange were barred from the studio commissary during meal times because too many plates of food were returned to the kitchen.

When the new picture started, they all went to the restaurant together, walked in casually, sat down for lunch.

“We looked around and saw women turn green, full forks descend from mouths and waitresses practically spilled their trays of food,” Chaney said. “At first it made us feel self-conscious, but then it became a joke, and we’d do it just to see the reaction.”

However, studio heads—possibly considering the world food situation as well as the welfare of studio workers—decided the “terrible trio” had to eat in their dressing rooms until production was finished.

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Times-Picayune, August 11, 1948

Abbott & Costello Meet Frankenstein, Times-Picayune, August 11, 1948*

Times-Picayune, August 12, 1948

Abbott & Costello Meet Frankenstein, Times-Picayune, August 12, 1948*

The Pittsburgh Press, August 16, 1948

Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein, The Pittsburgh Press, August 16, 1948 b

Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein, The Pittsburgh Press, August 16, 1948*

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, August 17, 1948

Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, August 17, 1948*

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, August 18, 1948

Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, August 17, 1948 b*

Youngstown Vindicator August 18, 1948

Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein Youngstown Vindicator, August 18, 1948*

Film Bulletin, August 18, 1948

Universal International: rumors that UI are faced with financial difficulties, direct, is traceable to the tendancy of the studio for the experiment using the product of so-called “class”. Sales staff would prefer the image of some of the money” for many of the masses definitely. Abbott and Costello Meet Frankensteinwill probably outside gross elegant Mr. Peabody and the Mermaid“. Maybe a change in studio management is in order!

アボットとコステロミートフランケンシュタインザ·フィルム速報1948年8月18日*

 The Pittsburgh Press, August 19, 1948

Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein, The Pittsburgh Press, August 19, 1948 b

Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein, The Pittsburgh Press, August 19, 1948*

Youngstown Vindicator, August 19, 1948

Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein Youngstown Vindicator, August 19, 1948*

The Pittsburgh Press, August 25, 1948

Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein, The Pittsburgh Press, August 25, 1948*

Spokane Daily Chronicle, August 27, 1948

Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein, Spokane Daily Chronicle, August 27, 1948*

Advocate, August 28, 1948

Abbott & Costello Meet Frankenstein, Advocate, August 28, 1948*

The Dispatch, September 11, 1948

Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein, The Dispatch, September 11, 1948*

Advocate, September 12, 1948

Abbott & Costello Meet Frankenstein, Advocate, September 12, 1948*

The Times-Picayune. October 7, 1948

Abbott & Costello Meet Frankenstein, Times-Picayune, August 11, 1948*

Film Bulletin, October 11, 1948

Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein Film Bulletin, October 11, 1948

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Unknown Newspaper

Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein Newspaper Ad 2*

The Sunday Morning Star, January 9, 1949

Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein, The Sunday Morning Star, January 9, 1949

Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein, The Sunday Morning Star, January 9, 1949 b*

Unknown French Newspaper

Abbott & Costello Meet Frankenstein French Newspaper Ad1*

Unknown Newspaper

Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein*

The Clatskanie Chief, February 11, 1949

Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein, The Clatskanie Chief, February 11, 1949*

Posters

Twenty Four Sheet Billboard Poster

Three Sheet

Half Sheet A

Half Sheet B

Insert

American-Produced One Sheet For Spanish Speaking Markets

Abbott & Costello Meet Frankenstein One sheet printed in the U.S., for use in Spanish speaking markets

1948 UK Quadアボットとコステロミートフランケンシュタイン1948ブリティッシュ·クワッド

1948 Belgian Posterアボット&コステロミートフランケンシュタイン1948ベルギーポスター

1948 Swedish One Sheet

アボット&コステロミートフランケンシュタインスウェーデン1枚

1948 Spanish One Sheet

アボットとコステロミートフランケンシュタイン1948スペイン1枚

1948 Italian Poster

イタリア語

1954 Japanese First Release Poster ( “20×29″)

アボット&コステロミートフランケンシュタイン1954まず日本盤20X 29

1956 Re-Release

アボットとコステロミートフランケンシュタイン1956再発行

1970 Yugoslavian Re-Release Poster

アボットとコステロミートフランケンシュタインユーゴスラビア1970

1970 German Re-Release Poster

アボットとコステロミートフランケンシュタインドイツ1970

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Lobby Cards

1948タイトルロビーカード

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3

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5

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1956  Re-Release Lobby Cards

アボットとコステロミートフランケンシュタイン1956再リリースロビーカード2

アボットとコステロミートフランケンシュタイン1956再リリースロビーカード1

アボットとコステロミートフランケンシュタイン1956再リリースロビーカード5

アボットとコステロミートフランケンシュタイン1956再リリースロビーカード4

アボットとコステロミートフランケンシュタイン1956再リリースロビーカード3

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Pressbooks and Programmes

French Pressbook

アボットとコステロミートフランケンシュタインフレンチプレスブック1

アボットとコステロミートフランケンシュタインフレンチプレスブック3

アボットとコステロミートフランケンシュタインフレンチプレスブック2

Austrian Programme

アボットとコステロミートフランケンシュタイン、オーストリアの計画

Danish Programme

Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein Danish programme

Icelandic Programme

Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein Icelandic programme

1970 German Programme

アボットとコステロミートフランケンシュタインドイツ1970プログラム

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Stills

アボット&コステロミートフランケンシュタインスペイン写真2Bud Abbott, Bela Lugosi and Lou Costello

アボット&コステロミートフランケンシュタインスペイン写真3 Bud Abbott, Lou Costello, Bela Lugosi and Glen Strange

アボット&コステロミートフランケンシュタインスペイン写真4Bela Lugosi and Lou Costello

アボット&コステロミートフランケンシュタインスペイン写真5Glen Strange and Bela Lugosi

アボット&コステロミートフランケンシュタインスペイン写真6Bela Lugosi and Lou Costello

アボット&コステロ写真6Glen Strange, Leonore Aubert and Bela Lugosi

アボット&コステロミートフランケンシュタインの写真Lou Costello and Bela Lugosi

アボット&コステロミートフランケンシュタインの写真Bela Lugosi

アボット&コステロミートフランケンシュタインの写真Bela Lugosi

アボット&コステロミートフランケンシュタインの写真Lou Costello, Bud Abbott, Glen Strange, Bela Lugosi and Lon Chaney

Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein (PS)Leonore Aubert and Bela Lugosi

アボット&コステロミートフランケンシュタインの写真Bela Lugosi and Glen Strange

A&CMF 6Leonore Aubert and Bela Lugosi

Jane Randolph and Glen Strange Abbott and Costello Meet FrankensteinJane Randolph and Glen Strange

Abbott and Costello Meet FrankensteinAbbott & Costello Meet FrankensteinBela Lugosi

Abbott and Costello Meet FrankensteinBoris Karloff helps to promote the film