1937: Tovarich

Bat Head 2

Tovarich

Tovarich (1937)

*

March 22 – April 17, 1937

Curran Theatre, San Francisco, California

San Francisco Chronicle, March 5, 1937

Tovarich, San Francisco Chronicle, March 5, 1937 2*

Oregonian, March 7, 1937

Tovarich, Oregonian, March 7, 1937*

San Francisco Chronicle, March 25, 1937

Tovarich, San Francisco Chronicle, March 25, 1937 2

Tovarich, San Francisco Chronicle, March 25, 1937*

“San Francisco Chronicle, March 27, 1937

Tovarich, San Francisco Chronicle, March 27, 1937 2

Tovarich, San Francisco Chronicle, March 27, 1937*

Oregonian, March 28, 1937

‘Tovarich’ Opens in Bay City; Promises to Be One of Year’s Biggest Hits

Tovarich, Oregonian, March 28, 1937*

San Francisco Chronicle, March 30, 1937

Tovarich, San Francisco Chronicle, March 30, 1937 2

Tovarich, San Francisco Chronicle, March 30, 1937*

The San Francisco Call-Bulletin, April 3, 1937

SO LONG, DRACULA – NICE TO HAVE MET YOU!

Dracula would reform quickly enough if only they’d let him.

I had it straight from his stage and screen counterpart, Bela Lugosi, after he had stolen into this department yesterday without his usual “Boo!” (If he had his way he’d never scare any more little children, either.

In the interest of less horror on the screen—England helped some with its movie ban of a year ago—Dracula is now occupying himself on the Curran stage as Russian Commissar Gorotochenko in Tovarich, his first straight role in years. If, meanwhile, they do decide to resume things horrific in Hollywood, they’ll have to wait—or “get another boy.”

“It’s about time the film producers were shown I can play roles like this in Tovarich, or those I did for 20 years before coming to Hollywood,” proclaimed the tall Hungarian, with a stroke of his stage Van Dyke.

Why Won’t They Let Me Be Human?

“I wouldn’t expect them to remember I played a Spanish lover in The Red Poppy in New York 15 years ago, or everything from Hamlet to Liliom in Budapest…comedy, tragedy, tragic-comedy—everything old Polonius named.

“But perhaps after Tovarich, they’ll call me for something half-way civilized—no Draculas, White Zombies, Chandus or Mysterious Mr.Wongs, I hope.”

Any future call for a human sort of role will find Mr. Lugosi ensconced in his Hollywood hill fortress of steel and concrete, as if fortified against one of his own scientific menaces. He is, in private life, unterrifying—a kindly husband, a kindly master of seven blooded canines, an art connoisseur.

“And please,” he pleaded, “don’t let people thing that because I’m playing a Russian Communist in Tovarich, I might still be a horror type. Gorotochenko is at least a hero to his own kind. But personally, I’m an individualist.”

*

San Francisco Chronicle, April 3, 1937

Tovarich, San Francisco Chronicle, April 14, 1937 2*

The San Francisco News, April 5, 1937

THOSE GOROTCHENKO WHISKERS ON BELA LUGOSI ARE GENUINE

Actor Who Has Made Record as Dracula Now Seeks to Show Movies He is Dramatic Possibility Through Work in Jacques Deval-Robert Sherwood Comedy

by Claude A. LaBelle

In Tovarich, the smash comedy at the Curran, Bela Lugosi wears some very snappy whiskers. I took it that “zits” or “beavers” were the usual chinpiece tucked on with spirit gum before every performance, and ripped off, with cussing on the side, after the show. By calling on Bela Lugosi at the hotel, I found out that they were simon pure. You see, I had momentarily forgotten that Hollywood leaves its mark on one, and down there, when the role calls for whiskers, the actor “grows a bush.” The camera detects crepe beards and artificial beards to easily. “Yes, it is so much more authentic,” he told me. “I do not have to be a matinee idol, and so I can wear whiskers if I wish.”

Fluent English

Mr. Lugosi’s English is fluent and his vocabulary extensive. He was years learning the groundwork of his English, then for five years he avoided his countrymen as an oil magnate avoids a process server.

“Some of my confreres thought I had gone high hat, or something, but it was necessary that I hear no word of Hungarian spoken if I was to be able to talk English fluently.”

When he perfected his English, he was cast for various roles in American plays, finally achieving national frame as Dracula. This also took him into the movies.

“But now horror pictures are definitely out, and I must do something else, and since Hollywood has me typed as a horror actor, I am pleased beyond measure to have the rich part of Gorotchenko in this play. It is a dramatic part, and I did such parts before Dracula was heard of as a play.”

*

San Francisco Chronicle, April 9, 1937

Tovarich, San Francisco Chronicle, April 9, 1937*

San Francisco Chronicle, April 14, 1937

Tovarich, San Francisco Chronicle, April 14, 1937 3

Tovarich, San Francisco Chronicle, April 14, 1937*

San Francisco Chronicle, April 17 1937

Tovarich, San Francisco Chronicle, April 17, 1937 2

Tovarich,San Francisco Chronicle, April 17 1937 2*

 April 19 – May 15, 1937

Biltmore Theater, Los Angeles, California

*

Springfield Republican, June 20, 1937

Tovarich, Springfield Republican, June 20, 1937