Dracula (Universal Studios, 1931)

Dracula 1931 One Sheet A1931 One Sheet Poster, Style A

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Six and a half years after its stage debut in England, Bram Stoker’s 1897 Gothic masterpiece received its first official screen adaptation with Bela Lugosi reprising his acclaimed stage role as Count Dracula. The film gave Lugosi the movie stardom he craved, but also cemented an unbreakable link between the actor and the character which would dog the rest of his career. Stoker’s novel was one of the first properties considered for production by Carl Laemmle when he founded Universal Pictures in 1915. Fifteen years later when Dracula was finally given the green light, it was envisaged as a lavish big budget adaptation of the novel, but financial difficulties caused by the stock market crash and the Great Depression led to the budget being severely slashed and the play being used as the basis of the film. When Dracula was re-released in 1936 several cuts were made as a result of the Motion Picture Production Code, a strictly enforced moral guideline, including an epilogue speech by Edward Van Sloan. The only known copy of this cut segment is now too deteriorated to restore to the film. A silent print of Dracula, which is currently unavailable, was produced for cinemas which had yet to convert to sound. In 2000, Dracula was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant.”

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Production company: Universal Studios

Producer: Carl Laemmle, Jr.,

Associate Producer: E.M. Asher

Director: Tod Browning (some scenes by Karl Freund)

Assistant Director: Scotty R. Beal

Second Assistant Director: Herman Schlom

Script: Garrett Fort

Adapted from the play by Hamilton Deane and John L. Balderston, based on the novel Dracula by Bram Stoker

Continuity: Louis Bromfield

Additional Dialogue: Dudley Murphy

Adaptation: Louis Stevens

Treatment: Fritz Stephani

Scenario Supervisor: Charles A. Logue

Art Director: Charles D. Hall

Cinematography: Karl Freund

First Assistant Cameramen: King Gray

Second Assistant Cameramen:  Frank H. Booth

Second Unit Director of Photography: Joseph Brotherton

Editor: Milton Carruth

Supervising Film Editor: Maurice Pivar

Set Designers: Herman Rosse and John Ivan Hoffman

Recording Supervisor: C. Roy Hunter

Boom Operator: Jack Bolger

Sound Mixer: William Hedgcock

Musical Supervisor & Conductor: Heinz Roemheld

Make-up: Jack P. Pierce

Set Decoration: Russell A. Gausman

Photographic Effects: Frank A Booth

Miniatures: William Davidson

Matte Artist: John P. Fulton

Costumes: Ed Ware and Vera West

Casting: Phil M. Friedman

Research: Nan Grant

Script Girl: Aileen Webster

Foley Artist: Jack Foley

Art Titles: Max Cohen

Still Photographer: Roman Freulich

Running Time: 78 minutes

Copyright number: LP1947, February 2nd 1931

Cast:

Bela Lugosi: Count Dracula

Helen Chandler: Mina

David Manners: Johnathan Harker

Dwight Frye: Renfield

Edward Van Sloan: Dr. Van Helsing

Herbert Bunston: Dr. Seward

Francis Dade: Lucy

Joan Standing: Briggs

Charles Gerrard: Martin

Moon Carroll: Maid

Josephine Velez: Grace, English nurse

Michael Visaroff: Innkeeper

Anna Bakacs: Innkeeper’s daughter

Barbara Bozoky: Innkeeper’s wife

Wyndham Standing: Surgeon

Geraldine Dvork: Dracula’s vampire bride

Dorothy Tree: Dracula’s vampire bride

Cornelia Thaw: Dracula’s vampire bride

Daisy Belmore: English coach passenger

Nicholas Bela: Transylvanian coach passenger

Carla Laemmle: Sara, the reading coach passenger

Donald Murphy: Coach passenger

John George: Van Helsing’s assistant

Tod Browning: Voice of the Harbor Master

Anita Harder: Flower girl

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Universal Exhibition Book, Universal Weekly, 1930-1931

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Telegram from Carl Laemmle Jr., March 27, 1930

beliu22[1]*

Unknown Newspaper, July, 1930

july, 1930*

The Norwalk Hour, September 24, 1930

Dracula, The Norwalk Hour, September 24, 1930*

The Pitsburgh Press, September 28, 1930

Dracula The Pitsburgh Press, September 28, 1930*

The Milwaukee Sentinel, October 4, 1930

Dracula, The Milwaukee Sentinel, October 4, 1930*

Motion Picture News, October 25, 1930

Dracula Motion Picture News, October 25, 1930*

The Portsmouth Sunday Times, October 5, 1930

Dracula The Portsmouth Sunday Times, October 5, 1930*

Pitsburgh Post-Gazette, October 10, 1930

Dracula, Pitsburgh Post-Gazette, October 10, 1930*

The Pitsburgh Press, November 2, 1930

Dracula, The Pitsburdh Press, November 2, 1930*

Motion Picture News, November 3, 1930

Dracula, Motion Picture News, November 3, 1930

Dracula Motion Picture News, November 3, 1930 2*

Variety, November 5, 1930

Dracula, Variety, November 5, 1930

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 The Pitsburgh Press, November 9, 1930

Dracula, The Pitsburgh Press, November 9, 1930*

The Film Daily, November 9, 1930

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Motion Picture News, December 6, 1930

Motion Picture News, December 6, 1930 1

Dracula Motion Picture News, December 6, 1930 2

Dracula Motion Picture News, December 6, 1930 3

Dracula Motion Picture News, December 6, 1930 1*

Variety, December 31, 1930

Dracula, Variety, December 31, 1930*

Plattsburgh Daily Press, January, 1931

Screen Life in Hollywood by Hubbard Keavy

Dracula Screen Life in Hollywood by Hubbard Keavy Plattsburgh Daily Press, January, 1931*

Silver Screen, January 1931

Silver Screen, January 1931A mysterious figure, a great actor, will this man replace Lon?

Is HE the Second Chaney?

HIS NAME is Bela Lugosi.

Like the beloved Lon, he is a man of mystery and a master of make-up.

He is working in movies at Universal, where Lon Chaney worked, being directed by Tod Browning, the man who directed nearly all of Lon’s greatest pictures.

His great role, “Dracula,” is that of an “undead” vampire who lives on the blood of humans, a part, that had he lived, would inevitably have gone to Chaney.

Lugosi, when first approached to make a picture of “Dracula” – he had played it on the stage – refused. Tests of other players were made. No one could be discovered who could effectively portray this supernatural character. Finally Lugosi signed for four weeks.

Before the cameras, he completed his work in one day. Again like Lon – an artist who knows his job and does it quietly and quickly.

Only in appearance does he differ. He is six feet one in height, with the dreamy, strange face of a mystic. His deep-set eyes have a peculiar fascinating quality.

Lon is gone but his art lives after him. May Lugosi be worthy of following in the path he made so thoroughly his own.

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New York Times February 12, 1931

New York Times February 12, 1931*

Unknown newspaper

Dracula At The Prince*

The Optimist (Abilene, Texas), February 12, 1931

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Unknown newspaper

New York Times February 12, 1931 a

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Unknown newspaper

Dracula Unknown Newspaper 9*

The New York Times, February 13, 1931

THE SCREEN

Bram Stoker’s Human Vampire

By MORDAUNT HALL

Count Dracula, Bram Stoker’s human vampire, who has chilled the spines of book readers and playgoers, is now to be seen at the Roxy in a talking film directed by Tod Browning, who delights in such bloodcurdling stories. It is a production that evidently had the desired effect upon many in the audience yesterday afternoon, for there was a general outburst of applause when Dr. Van Helsing produced a little cross that caused the dreaded Dracula to fling his cloak over his head and make himself scarce.But Dracula’s evil work is not ended until Dr. Van Helsing hammers a stake through the Count’s heart as he lies in his native earth in a box.Mr. Browning is fortunate in having in the leading rôle in this eerie work, Bela Lugosi, who played the same part on the stage when it was presented here in October, 1927. What with Mr. Browning’s imaginative direction and Mr. Lugosi’s makeup and weird gestures, this picture succeeds to some extent in its grand guignol intentions.As the scenes flash by there are all sorts of queer noises, such as the cries of wolves and the hooting of owls, not to say anything of the screams of Dracula’s feminine victims, who are found with twin red marks on their white throats.The Count is able to change himself into a vampire that flies in through the window and in this guise he is supposed to be able to talk to his victims, who are either driven insane or are so thoroughly terrified that they would sooner do his bidding that pay heed to those who have their welfare at heart. Martin, the keeper in the sanitarium in which an unfortunate individual named Renfield is under supervision, fires at the big bat with a shot gun, but, of course, misses.To enhance the supernatural effect of this film there is a fog in many of the scenes. The first glimpses are of ordinary humans, but so soon as Renfield goes to the Transylvania castle of the Count, who lives on for centuries by his vampirish actions, there are bony hands protruding from boxes, rats and other animals fleeing, and corridors that are thick with cobwebs and here and there a hungry spider.Most of the excitement takes place in Carfax Abbey and other places in England, the Count having traveled there to accomplish his blood-thirsty intentions. To start the grim work he causes all the ship’s crew to go insane and commit suicide, but his subsequent activities are not as fruitful as he anticipates.Helen Chandler gives an excellent performance as one of the girls who is attacked by the “undead” Count. David Manners contributes good work. Dwight Frye does fairly well as Renfield. Herbert Bunston is a most convincing personality. Charles Gerrard affords a few laughs as Martin.This picture can at least boast of being the best of the many mystery films.Bram Stoker’s Human Vampire. DRACULA, with Bela Lugosi, Helen Chandler, David Manners, Dwight Frye, Edward Van Sloan, Herbert Bunston, Frances Dade, Charles Gerrard, Joan Standing, Moon Carroll and Josephine Velez, based on Bram Stoker’s novel, directed by Tod Browning; overture, “Rhapsody in Blue”; Movietone news real: “Hello, New York!” with Santry and Norton and others, including Leonide Masine and the Roxyettes. At the Roxy.

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The Evening Independent, February 20, 1931

Dracula. The Evening Independent, February 20, 1931*

Unknown newspaper

Dracula 3

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Unknown newspaper

Dracula 5

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The Evening Independent, February 21, 1931

Dracula. The Evening Independent, February 21, 1931*

St. Petersburgh Times, February 22, 1931

Dracula, St. Petersburgh Times, February 22, 1931 2

Dracula, St. Petersburgh Times, February 22, 1931 3

Dracula, St. Petersburgh Times, February 22, 1931*

Unknown newspaper

Dracula 4

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The Evening Independent, February 23, 1931

Dracula. The Evening Independent, February 23, 1931 2

Dracula. The Evening Independent, February 23, 1931*

Unknown newspaper

Dracula Unknown Newspaper 8*

The Pitsburgh Press February 26, 1931

The Pitsburgh Press February 26, 1931

The Pitsburgh Press February 26, 1931 2

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Unknown newspaper, courtesy of  Vintage Cinema Ads

Dracula Courtesy of Vintage Cinema Ads*

The Pittsburgh Post, February 26, 1931

The Pittsburgh Post February 26, 1931*

The Pittsburgh Post, February 27, 1931

The Pittsburgh Post February 27, 1931*

Unknown newspaper

Dracula Unknown Newspaper 7*

The Simmons Brand (Abilene, Texas), February 14, 1931

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The Kingston Daily Freeman, February 26, 1931

Dracula, The Kingston Daily Freeman, February 26, 1931*

Unknown newspaper

Dracula, unknown newspaer 1*

Photoplay Magazine, March 1931.

Dracula Photoplay Magazine, March 1931.*

The Pitsburgh Press, March 1, 1931

Dracula. The Pitsburgh Press, March 1, 1931*

Yale Daily News no. 118, March 2, 1931

Yale Daily News no. 118 March 2 1931*

The Ogdensburg Republican-Journal, March 4, 1931

The Ogdensburg Republican-Journal, March 4, 1931

Dracula The Ogdensburg Republican-Journal, March 2, 1931*

Ottawa Citizen, March 6, 1931

Dracula, Ottawa Citizen, March 6, 1931*

Ottawa Citizen, March 7, 1931

Dracula, Ottawa Citizen, March 7, 1931*

The Washington Reporter, March 9, 1931

The Washington Reporter, March 9, 1931*

Unknown newspaper

Dracula unknown newspaper

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The Washington reporter, March 10, 1931

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Unknown newspaper

Dracula Unknown Newspaper 4*

Eugene, Register-Guard, March 13, 1931

Dracula, Eugene, Register-Guard, March 13, 1931*

The Montreal Gazette March 13, 1931

The Montreal Gazette March 13, 1931*

The Montreal Gazette March 14, 1931

The Montreal Gazette March 14, 1932*

Eugene, Register-Guard, March 14, 1931

Dracula, Eugene, Register-Guard, March 14, 1931*

Eugene, Register-Guard, March 15, 1931

Dracula, Eugene, Register-Guard, March 15, 1931

Dracula, Eugene, Register-Guard, March 15, 1931 2*

Eugene, Register-Guard, March 16, 1931

Dracula, Eugene, Register-Guard, March 16, 1931*

Unknown newspaper

Dracula, unknown newspaper*

 Sheboygan Press, March 16,1931

March 16, Dracula newspaper advertising Sheboygan Press, 1931*

The Montreal Gazette, March 16, 1931

Dracula, The Montreal Gazette, March 16, 1931

Dracula, The Montreal Gazette, March 16, 1931 2*

Eugene, Register-Guard, March 17, 1931

Dracula, Eugene, Register-Guard, March 17,1931 2

Dracula, Eugene, Register-Guard, March 17,1931*

Rivoli Theatre, Matawan, New Jersey, March 1931

Dracula Rivoli Theatre, Matawan, New Jersey March 1931*

Unknown newspaper

Dracula Unknown Newspaper 3*

Edmonton Journal, March 17, 1931

Edmonton Journal, March 17, 1931 (1)*

Unknown newspaper

Dracula Unknown Newspaper 1*

The Westfield Leader, March 18, 1931

Dracula, The Westfield Leader, March 18, 1931 ad

Dracula, The Westfield Leader, March 18, 1931 article*

Eugene, Register-Guard, March 18, 1931

Dracula, Eugene, Register-Guard, March 18, 1931*

Unknown newspaper

Dracula Unknown Newspaper 13*

Edmonton Journal, March 19, 1931

Foot Light Glow

Capitol: The strange mysterious, “Dracula” will rise and dingy in the monastery mouse to be displayed on the Capitol screen in a series of horrible almost scene-infested, out of the shadow of musty old coffin. There, live in the shadow of the night to weild for a supernatural power over the rising hum the specter of the past of the dead again, without leaving visible traces without the massacre of the devil, he is again in the mist of dawn melting. By the Bela Lugosi, powerful figure of Count Dracula, which came into effect in this dramatic picture is like that.Would you be horrified to hear that draws howls a long night? If you had a premonition about the crash is bad for you, thinking to freeze you in fear you? If you met him, what afraid of hypnosis this maniac? Alternatively, the fear of the dead 500 years ago of ARS neighbor pounces quietly and quickly to his victims – all is very real in the “Dracula”, that there is one of these grip sheet.If you serve him through his use of hypnosis, still, calm, this power TOS was afraid, to understand this great phenomenon, there is a professor of strong will and try to destroy him. Dramatic situation, he has to look at the face Dracula and horrible finally, the risk of facing with others to keep track of Dracula in his coffin in the elbow of Professor Most you he and put you, you are full of grip adventiures. . . Professor and win! You go by all means, “Dracula” will be displayed. You afraid to miss it now.Talkartoon, there is a comedy snappy “caption. You news of Fox movie tone, two days more, to” go one yard to give laugh a lot to relieve taken you from tension attituyou in order to give a contrast to the program It is very interesting that you complete the program with excellent Congress – CEB

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Reading Eagle, March 21, 1931

Dracula, Reading Eagle, March 21, 1931*

Unknown newspaper

Dracula Ad*

The Reading Eagle, the March 22, 1931

Dracula Reading Eagle, March 22, 1931

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Sarasota Herald-Tribune, March 23, 1931

Dracula, Sarasota Herald-Tribune, March 23, 1931*

Unknown newspaper

Dracula Unknown Newspaper 12*

Sarasota Herald-Tribune, March 24, 1931

Dracula. Sarasota Herald-Tribune, March 24, 1931*

Sarasota Herald-Tribune, March 25, 1931

Dracula. Sarasota Herald-Tribune, March 25, 1931*

Toledo Blade, date unknown

Dracula Toledo Blade 1

Dracula Toledo Blade 2*

Berkeley Daily Gazette, April 2, 1931

Dracula, Berkeley Daily Gazette, April 2, 1931*

Berkeley Daily Gazette, April 3, 1931

Dracula, Berkeley Daily Gazette, April 3, 1931*

Unknown newspaper

Courtesy of  Vintage Cinema Ads

Dracula vintage cinema ads*

Charleston Daily Mail, April 5, 1931

April 5, Dracula newspaper advertising Charleston Daily Mail, 1931*

Spokane Daily Chronicle, April 9, 1931

Dracula. Spokane Daily Chronicle, April 9, 1931*

De Stad, April 10, 1931

De Stad, April 10, 1931*

Spokane Daily, April 10, 1931

Dracula. Spokane Daily, April 10, 1931 1

Dracula. Spokane Daily, April 10, 1931 4

Dracula. Spokane Daily, April 10, 1931 3

Dracula. Spokane Daily, April 10, 1931 2*

Spokane Daily, April 11, 1931

Dracula. Spokane Daily, April 11, 1931*

Aberdeen Daily News, April 12, 1931

Dracula, Aberdeen Daily News, April 12, 1931*

Spokane Daily, April 13, 1931

Dracula. Spokane Daily, April 13, 1931*

Unknown newspaper

Dracula Unknown Newspaper 15*

The Boston Globe April 13, 1931

The Boston Globe April 13, 1931*

The Evening Huronite, April 13, 1931

Dracula, The Evening Huronite, April 13, 1931Dracula Is Called Most Weird StoryBran Stoker’s Famous Mystery Story Comes To Screen At Huron Tomorrow

“The weirdest story in the world” has been dramatized on the talking screen.  The story in question is Bram Stoker’s immortal and nerve-tingling novel of a deathless vampire, entitled “Dracula.” So if you plan to go to the Huron theatre during the week of Sunday, Monday or Tuesday prepare yourself for a truly different and exciting evening’s entertainment.

Of course, if you’ve read “Dracula” there is no need to tell you more. All the king’s horses and all the king’s men won’t be able to keep you from seeing the picture. And if you’ve never heard of “Dracula” you owe it to yourself to see this uncanny dramatization of Bram Stoker’s justly famous novel. For “Dracula” is a mystery story unlike any other you have ever seen. And meeting “Dracula” for the first time is an experience in theatre-going you will long remember.Without telling you too much, suffice to say that “Dracula” is a story of a vampire man, dead more than five hundred years, who comes to life between the hours of sunset and sunrise, stalking the earth to search out young and beautiful victims. Sometimes he comes to life in the form of a wolf, other times as a soft, choking, mysterious mist, wreaking his strange vengeance on all those who cross his path”. This combat of deathless forces, as you may well imagine, makes for gripping, fantastic, awe inspiring drama that arouses and maintains intense interest from beginning to end.The role of the vampire. Count Dracula, is played with remarkable skill by Bela Lugosi, noted actor of the legitimate stage, who originally created this role in the highly successful stage version of Stoker’s “Dracula.” Sinister, evil and terrifying to look upon, Lugosi’s Dracula is a high mark in unusual and fantastic characterization. David Manners portrays the role of the young boy who desperately attempts to save his finance from the influence of Dracula; and Dwight Frye is convincing as the lawyer who fails under the spell of the deathless vampire.Others in the cast include Helen Chandler, in a fine role, Edward Van Sloan, a member of the stage cast, Frances Dade, Joan Standing and Herbert Bunston. “Dracula” was directed by Tow Browning, remembered for many of Lon Chaney’ssuccesses.

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The Leamington Post. April 23, 1931

Dracula, The Leamington Post. April 23, 1931

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Fox Gillioz Cinema, unknown newspaper

Dracula Ad 2

Dracula Ad 1*

Berkeley Daily Gazette, April 24, 1931

Dracula, The Berkeley Gazette, April 24, 1931 1

Dracula, The Berkeley Gazette, April 24, 1931 2*

Schenectady Gazette, April 25, 1931

Dracula, Schenectady Gazette, April 25, 1931*

Unknown newspaper

Dracula Unknown Newspaper 16*

The Breckenridge American (Breckenridge, Tex), April 26, 1931

Dracula, The Breckenridge American (Breckenridge, Tex), April 26, 1931*

Schenectady Gazette, April 27, 1931

Dracula, Schenectady Gazette, April 27, 1931

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Casa Grande Dispatch, May 1, 1931

Casa Grande Dispatch, May 1, 1931

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Unknown newspaper

Courtesy of   Vintage Theatre Ads

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La Opinion (Los Angeles), May 7, 1931

This ad for the Spanish version of Dracula mistakenly features the images of Bela Lugosi, David Manners and Helen Chandler

Dracula, La Opinion (Los Angeles), May 7, 1931 - John Donaldson Collection(Courtesy of John Donaldson)

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La Opinion (Los Angeles), May 8, 1931

This ad for the Spanish version of Dracula mistakenly features the images of Bela Lugosi and Helen Chandler

Dracula, La Opinion (Los Angeles), May 8, 1931 - John Donaldson Collection(Courtesy of John Donaldson)

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 The Afro American May 23, 1931

Dracula. The Afro American May 23, 1931*

Unknown newspaper, May, 1932

Dracula, May, 1931*

Lewiston Morning Tribune, May 29, 1931Dracula, Lewiston Morning Tribune, May 29, 1931 Photo

Dracula, Lewiston Morning Tribune, May 29, 1931 Ad*

Unknown newspaper

Courtesy of  Vintage Cinema Ads

Dracula vintage cinema ads*

Unknown newspaper

Dracula Unknown Newspaper 14*

The Modern Screen, June, 1931

DRACULA (Universal) – A weird story about creatures who are “undead.” It’s thrilly and creepy. Bela Lugosi, David Manners and Helen Chandler. Very Good – but not for children.

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 The Cumberland Evening Times, June 10, 1931

Dracula, The Cumberland Evening Times, June 10, 1931*

Unknown newspaper

Dracula Unknown Newspaper 18*

The Kingsport Times, June 12, 1931

Dracula, The Kingsport Times, June 12, 1931 3

Spooks Will Invade Strand Theatre Wednesday 10:30 pm

Dracula, The Kingsport Times, June 12, 1931 2

One of the most famous of all actors on stage or screen would like to forget the character that made him famous! Audiences on Broadway were thrilled for more than two years by his artistry; millions of picture fans throughout the country are being fascinated by the startling impersonation he gives on the screen. But the character haunts him, and he never wants to play it again.

The actor is Bela Lugosi, and the character is Count Dracula in the most startling of all plays or pictures — “Dracula.” Bram Stoker, the famous English novelist, wrote it first as a novel — this terrifying narration of an “undead” being who rises from his grave at night and through his horrible influence brings death and suffering to his victims.

For more than a thousand nights, Lugosi played it in the theatre. Then when the Universal Studios decided to produce the great story as a picture, Lugosi was the natural choice for the role he had made so famous on

the stage. At first, it was difficult to prevail upon him to appear on the screen. He had lived with the horrible vampire character so long on the stage that he wanted to forget, and how could he forget if  he played it again on the screen?

But he finally consented, and  for weeks at the Universal City studios while the picture was in production, he lived again the startling’, fantastic role of Count Dracula. Those who have seen both play and picture assert that his impersonation for the films is even greater than his stage work.But, now that the picture is finished and shortly to be shown at the Strand Theatre, Lugosi says he will nver play the role again.And Lugosi’s determination is in itself a great tribute to his ability as an actor. If he had  been able to act the part mechanically —had not thrown himself heart and soul into the role—it would not have the terrors that it now has. But a great artist does not play mechanically, and Lugosi is a great artist.  Thus, each night in the theatre and for .many days at the picture studios, his nervous system has been  subjected to a terrible strain.“Dracula” brought him fame and fortune, but Lugosi, wants more than anything else, to escape from Count Dracula. It is well, however, that he die not reach this decision before the marking of the picture—well for the millions of fans who will be fascinated by his great work on the screen.When “Dracula” is shown at the Strand Theatre, local theatre-goers will see one of the most remarkable casts ever assembled. Besides Lugosi, two other, players of the original stage cast appear — Edward Van Sloan and Herbert Bunston. In addition, there are many other favorites, including David Manners, Helen Chandler, Dwight Frye, Francis Dade, Charles Gerrard and Joan Standing.Tod Browning, creator of weird and unusual films, directed the picture.In addition to .the feature, “Dracula,” there will be a stage show in the form of Ali-Din. Ali-Din will present a spook party featuring spirit slate writing, talking skulls and handkerchiefs taring into snakes.The admission will be the same to everyone. No half fare tickets will be sold as the program is not recommended for children under twelve. The box office opens at 10:15 — program starts at 10:45.

Dracula, The Kingsport Times, June 12, 1931 1*

Spokane Daily Chronicle, June 20, 1931

Dracula, Spokane Daily Chronicle, June 20, 1931

Dracula, Spokane Daily Chronicle, June 20, 1931 2*

Spokane Daily Chronicle, June 22, 1931

Dracula, Spokane Daily Chronicle, June 22, 1931*

 Spokane Daily Chronicle, June 23, 1931

Dracula, Spokane Daily Chronicle, June 23, 1931

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Variety, July 21, 1931

Lugosi fan mail, July 21, 1931

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Unknown newspaper

Dracula Unknown Newspaper 19*

Unknown newspaper

Dracula Unknow newspaper 1*

Modern Screen, August, 1931

Dracula (Universal) – A story of the souls who are dead yet not dead – “undead” they are called. They prey upon the living. A creepy and chilling story. Bela Lugosi, Helen Chandler and David Manners have the chief roles. Very good but hardly suitable for children.

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Eugene, Register-Guard, August 21, 1931

Dracula, Eugene, Register-Guard, August 21, 1931*

Eugene, Register-Guard, August 22, 1931

Dracula, Eugene, Register-Guard, August 22, 1931*

Eugene, Register-Guard, August 23,1931

Dracula, Eugene, Register-Guard, August 23,1931

Dracula, Eugene, Register-Guard, August 23,1931 2*

Eugene, Register-Guard, August 24, 1931

Dracula, Eugene, Register-Guard, August 24, 1931*

 Turtle Mountain Star, August 27, 1931

Dracula, Turtle Mountain Star, August 27, 1931 2

Dracula, Turtle Mountain Star, August 27, 1931*

Unknown newspaper

Dracula unknown newspaper 2*

The 1931 Film Daily Year Book of Motion Pictures

The Calgary Herald September 1, 1931

The Calgary Herald September 1, 1931*

The Caldwell News and The Burleson County Ledger (Caldwell, Tex.),September 4, 1931

The Caldwell News and The Burleson County Ledger (Caldwell, Tex.),September 4, 1931 1

Dracula, The Caldwell News and The Burleson County Ledger (Caldwell, Tex.), Vol. 46, No. 23, Ed. 1 Friday, September 4, 1931 2*

Unknown newspaper

Dracula Unknown Newspaper 20*

The Florence Times-News, September 23, 1931

Dracula The florence Times-News, September 23, 1931 1

Dracula The Florence Times-News, September 23, 1931 2

Dracula The Florence Times-News, September 23, 1931 3*

Bela Lugosi by Joseph Grant for the Los Angeles Record, 1931

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Unknown newspaper

Dracula Unknown Newspaper 21*

Tulia Herald, November 12, 1931

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Wisconsin, Daily Journal, date unknown

Dracula Ad From The Wisconsin, Daily Journal*

Unknown newspaper

Dracula, Unknown Newspaper*

Keith’s Theatre, Baltimore

Dracula Keiths Theatre, Baltimore -1931 ad*

Unknown French newspaper

Dracula French Ad*

Unknown Australian newspaper

Dracula Unknown Newspaper 2*

 Film Daily Year Book of Motion Pictures, 1931

Dracula The 1931 Film Daily Year Book of Motion Pictures 2

Dracula The 1931 Film Daily Year Book of Motion Pictures 1

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Aberdeen Daily News, February 7, 1932

Dracula, Aberdeen Daily News, February 7, 1932 2

Dracula, Aberdeen Daily News, February 7, 1932*

Unknown Australian newspaper, February 1932

Dracula, unknown Australian newspaperFebruary 1932 Dracula contest*

Sydney Newspaper, February 18, 1932

Dracula Sydney newspaper February 18, 1932 2

Dracula Sydney newspaper February 18, 1932*

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Wallace County Chronicle and Otautau Standard (New Zealand), July 1932

Dracula Otautau Standard and Wallace County Chronicle, Volume XXVIII, Issue 1380, 5 July 1932, NZ

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Picture Show Annual 1932

Dracula, Picture Show Annual 1932

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The Sunday Spartanburgh Herald-Journal, October 9, 1938

Dracula, The Sunday Spartanburgh Herald-Journal, October 9, 1938*

The Miami News, May 9, 1939

Dracula. The Miami News, May 9, 1939*

Unknown newspaper, December 22, 1952

Dracula, December 22, 1952*

Posters

Dracula 24 Sheet Poster

1931 Twenty-Four Sheet (original in full colour)

Dracula 1931 One Sheet Style F

1931 One Sheet

Dracula 1931 One Sheet

1931 One Sheet

Dracula One Sheet 4

1931 One Sheet

Dracula Three Sheet Poster

1931 Three Sheet (original in full colour)

Dracula Three Sheet

1931 Three Sheet (original in full colour)

Dracula 22 x 28 poster

1931 22″ x 28″ Poster

Dracula Six Sheet

1931 Six Sheet (original in full colour)

Dracula 1931 Window Card

1931 Window Card

Dracula Banner

1931 3’x10′ Banner

(original in purple, silver and green -metallic letters on felt background)

Dracula Three Sheet Block

1931 Three Sheet Block

Dracula 1938 one sheet (1)

1938 Re-Release One Sheet

Dracula 1947 One Sheet

1947 Re-Release One Sheet

Dracula 1947 Three Sheet

1947 Re-Release Insert

Dracula 1947 Re-release Insert Posternknown Universal re-release insert previously unknown Universal re-release insert

1947 Re-Release Three SheetDracula 1951 one sheet1951 Re-Release One Sheet

Dracula 1951 half sheet

1951 Re-Release Half Sheet

Dracula 1951 Insert

1951 Re-Release Insert

1951 Dracula re-release banner

1951 Re-Release Banner

Dracula France

French Poster date unknown

Dracula 1960s one sheet

1960 Re-Release One Sheet

Dracula French 1966 Re-Release Grande

French 1966 Re-Release Grande

Dracula 1971 Spanish one sheet

Spanish 1971 Re-Release One Sheet

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Lobby Cards

Jumbo lobby card

1931 Lobby Cards

Dracula 1931 title lobby card

Dracula 1931 lobby card 1

Dracula 1931 lobby card 2

Dracula 1931 lobby card 3

Dracula 1931 lobby card 4

Dracula 1931 lobby card 5

1938 Re-Release Lobby Cards

1938 a further issuance

2 1938 re-issuance

3 1938 re-issuance

1938 re-issuance 4

1938 engraved 5

6 1938 re-issuance

1947 Re-Release Lobby Cards

Dracula 1947 Re-Release Lobby Card

Dracula 1947 reissue lobby card 1

Dracula 1947 reissue lobby card 2

Dracula 1947 reissue lobby card 3

1951 Re-Release Lobby Cards

Dracula 1951 Re-Release Lobby Card 1a

Dracula 1951 Re-Release Lobby Card

Dracula 1951 Re-Release Lobby Card c

Dracula 1951 lobby card

Mexican Lobby Cards (Date Unknown)

Dracula Mexican Lobby Card 3

Dracula Mexican Lobby Card 2

Dracula Mexican Lobby Card

Dracula Mexican Lobby Card 1

1960s Mexican Lobby Cards

Dracula 1960s Mexican Lobby Card 1

The lobby card below mistakenly features a scene from Universal’s 1931 Spanish language version of Dracula

Dracula 1960s Mexican Lobby Card 2

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Publicity Stills

Dracula 1931 Publicity Still 4

Dracula 1931 Publicity Still 3

Dracula Lobby Card

Dracula 1931 Publicity Still 1

Dracula 1931 Publicity Still 2

Dracula - Helen Chandler and Bela Lugosi

Dracula 1931 Publicity Still 6

Dracula 1*

British Front of House Cards

Dates unknown

Dracula UK Front of House 1

Dracula UK Front of House 2

Dracula UK Front of House 3

Dracula UK Front of House 4

Dracula UK Front of House 5

Dracula UK Front of House 6

Dracula UK Front of House 7

Dracula UK Front of House 8

Dracula British Front of House

The card below mistakenly features a scene from Universal’s1931 Spanish language version of Dracula

Dracula Front of House

1951 Re-Release

Dracula 1951 Re-Release

lfCAKN3QOC

Dracula 1951 Re-issuse(Courtesy of David J. Skal)

Dracula 1951 Publicity Still 2*

Roxy Cinema Advertising

Dracula at the Roxy*

Heralds

5.5″ x 7″ Herald

1931 herald

Herald 2

Dracula Herald A

8″ x 10.5″ Herald

Dracula 8 X 10.5 Herald 1

Dracula 8 X 10.5 Herald 2

Dracula 8 X 10.5 Herald 3

Prince’s Theatre Herald

Dracula Princes Theatre Herals 1

Dracula Princes Theatre Herals 2

Dracula Princes Theatre Herals 3

Spanish Heralds

Dracula Spanish Herald 2

Dracula Spanish Herald 1

Spanish Herald 5

Dracula Spanish Herald 3

Spanish Herald 4

Singapore Herald

Dracula Singapore Cinema ad*

Cinema Programmes

The Roxy Theatre, New York

Dracula Roxy Theatre Programme

Dracula Roxy Theatre Programme 2

*

The Capitol, Bombay, India

Dracula Capitol Cinema Programme, India

Dracula Herald 2*

Pressbooks

1931 Pressbook

Dracula 1931 press book 1

Dracula 1931 press book 3

Dracula 1931 press book 2

1937 Pressbook

Dracula 1937 Pressbook 1

Dracula 1937 Pressbook 2

Date unknown

Dracula

Dracula Pressbook 2*

French Pressbook

Dracula French Pressbook

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Advertising Blocks

Dracula, Advertising 1

Dracula Advertising 2

Dracula Advertising 3*

Dracula art*

A promotional packet of wolfbane 

Free Wolfbane*

Photoplay Edition of Dracula

Dracula Photoplay Edition 1

Dracula Photoplay Edition 2

Dracula Photoplay Edition 3

Dracula Photoplay Edition 4*

A letter from Universal President Carl Laemmle to a fan of Dracula

Carl Laemmle Letter. June 9, 1931

*

Cinemas

The Stanley, Jersey City

Dracula at the Stanley, Kennedy Boulevard, Jersey CityKentucky Theatre, Lexington

Dracula Kentucky Theatre, LexingtonNew Cross Kinema

Dracula New Cross Kinema*

Stills

Dracula behind the scenes 1Tod Browning filming Frances Dade and Helen Chandler

Dracula Promo still 1Bela Lugosi

Dracula - Edward Van SloanEdward Van Sloan (Courtesy of David J. Skal)

Dracula - Helen Chandler 2Helen Chandler (Courtesy of David J. Skal)

Dracula - Helen Chandler & Francis DadeHelen Chandler and Frances Dade (Courtesy of David J. Skal)

Dracula Still qBela Lugosi

Dracula's Web

Bela Lugosi

Dracula Promo still 2Bela LugosiDracula Still yBela Lugosi

Bela Lugosi as DraculaBela Lugosi

Courtesy of  www.doctormacro.com

Dracula Still wBela Lugosi

Dracula Still 5Bela Lugosi

Dracula Still 16

Bela LugosiDracula Still mDracula Still lBela LugosiDracula Still kBela Lugosi

Dracula Still 4Bela Lugosi

Dracula Still 6Bela Lugosi

DraculaBela Lugosi

Dracula Still 14Bela Lugosi

Dracula Paul Seiler 1Edward Van Sloan and Bela Lugosi (Courtesy of Paul Seiler)

Dracula - Edward Van Sloan and Bela LugosiEdward Van Sloan and Bela Lugosi

Dracula Still zBela Lugosi

Dracula Still g

Bela Lugosi

Dracula Still uBela Lugosi

Dracula - Bela Lugosi, Helen Chandler, Tod BrowningBela Lugosi, Helen Chandler and Tod Browning

Tod Browning, Bela Lugosi, Horace Liveright, and Dudley MurphyTod Browning, Bela Lugosi, Horace Liveright, and Dudley Murphy

Dracula Still dEdward Van Sloan, David Manners, Helen Chandler and Bela Lugosi

Dracula Still fBela Lugosi, David Manners, Helen Chandler, Dwight Frye and Edward Van Sloan

Dracula Still 13Bela Lugosi, David Manners, Helen Chandler, Dwight Frye and Edward Van Sloan

Dracula - Helen Chandler and Bela Lugosi - Paul Seiler Collection 4Helen Chandler and Bela Lugosi (Courtesy of Paul Seiler)

Dracula Still pFrances Dade and Bela Lugosi

Dracula Still 10Frances Dade and Bela Lugosi

Dracula Still nHelen Chandler and Bela Lugosi

Dracula Still b Helen Chandler and Bela Lugosi

Dracula Still 12Helen Chandler, Bela Lugosi and Dwight Frye

Dracula Still hHelen Chandler, Bela Lugosi and Dwight Frye

Dwight FryeDwight Frye

Dracula Still jBela Lugosi

Dracula Still vGeraldine Dvorak, Dorothy Tree and Cornelia Thaw

Dracula Still 8Bela Lugosi and Dwight Frye

Dracula Still 9Bela Lugosi in a scene deleted from the final cut

Dracula Still 11Bela Lugosi in a trick shot which didn’t appear in the film

Dracula Still tBela Lugosi

Dracula Still sDwight Frye and Bela Lugosi

Dracula's Brides: Dorothy Tree, Geraldine Dvorak and Cornelia ThawDorothy Tree, Geraldine Dvorak and Cornelia Thaw

Dracula Still rDorothy Tree, Geraldine Dvorak and Cornelia Thaw

Dracula

Bela Lugosi is rumoured to be one of the seated medical students in this scene

(Courtesy of David J. Skal)

Bela Lugosi

Courtesy of  www.doctormacro.com

Dracula 1Bela Lugosi and Frances Dade

Dracula Still 18Bela Lugosi and unidentified extra

Dracula

Frances Dade and Bela Lugosi

Dracula Still 3Bela Lugosi and Helen Chandler

Dracula Still aBela Lugosi and Helen Chandler

Courtesy of  www.doctormacro.com

Edward Van Sloan and Bela Lugosi

Dracula Edward Van Sloan and Bela LugosiEdward Van Sloan and Bela Lugosi

Dracula Still 15Edward Van Sloan and Bela Lugosi

Dracula - Helen Chandler & David MannersHelen Chandler and David Manners

Dracula - Helen Chandler & David Manners 2Helen Chandler and David Manners

Dracula

Bela Lugosi and Helen Chandler

Courtesy of  www.doctormacro.com

Dracula Still xBela Lugosi and Helen Chandler on a portion of the set which didn’t appear in the final cut of the film.

Dracula 1

Bela Lugosi and Helen Chandler on a portion of the set which didn’t appear in the final cut of the film.

Dracula Still iBela Lugosi and Helen Chandler

Dracula - Bela Lugosi and Dwight FyreBela Lugosi and Dwight Fyre

Dracula

Helen Chandler, Bela Lugosi and Dwight Fyre

Dracula - David Manners, Helen Chandler and Edward Van SloanDavid Manners, Helen Chandler and Edward Van Sloan

Dracula epilogueEdward Van Sloan delivering his epilogue speech. Cut upon Dracula’s re-release in 1936, the surviving footage is now too deteriorated to reinstall into the film.

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Click on the link below for details of the 1938 Dracula and Frankenstein double-bill

The 1938 Dracula & Frankenstein Double-Bill